Ottawa Craft Beer Run 5k Race Recap

Yesterday I took a chance and ran the 2016 Ottawa Craft Beer Run 5k. The route was a simple out and back along the Rideau Canal, beginning and ending at the newly renovated Landsowne Park with the turn around point at Dow’s Lake. If you have ever visited Ottawa, you know this a scenic and relatively flat route.

The race was part of/connected to the Ottawa Craft Beer Festival, a three day event held at the Aberdeen Pavilion on the Landsowne grounds.  Race registration included a weekend festival pass, a festival beer glass, a shirt, a useful bottle opener finisher’s medal, and a delicious beer from local craft brewer Beau’s. Four Beau’s beers were on offer — the classic Lug Tread, a German Lager styled Marzen, a lighter Belgian style Patersbier, and a tart Danish styled Old Skal. I opted for the strong Marzen as my morning race reward, but returned later during the festival for the Old Skal and I’m glad I waited. Amazing beer, with a unique taste. But I digress. In addition to these race day goodies, there was also samples from gluten free Stoked Oats and giveaways from Yelp.

Racers had the option to pick up their bibs either Friday evening or Saturday morning. I opted for the morning pickup as I didn’t really want to head into downtown traffic on a Friday during my holidays. This decision doesn’t always pay off, but the race organizers had a decent system in place to get bibs in our hands quickly.  Also, prior to the race, there was warm-up yoga on the Great Lawn. Fortunately, the weather was fantastic so this all worked out.

After a quick warm-up run around the lawn and a little yoga, we headed over to the start line set up on Queen Elizabeth Drive along side the UNESCO World Heritage Site Rideau Canal. This year the race worked with local race experts SportStats and Somersault Events to coordinate the race logistics and  provide a chip-timed event. As the Ottawa Craft Beer Run is relatively new (this is only its 3rd year), this move should help cement the event on the local running scene.

Because the race is such a new event, there are still a few growing pains to be worked out. Most notably, the connection with the Ottawa Craft Beer Festival seems a little unclear. Although racers are told they get to enjoy a Beau’s beer following the race, the beer festival organizers and workers did not seem to know this or what the protocol was for getting us our reward. Most likely this was a result of too may moving parts for two connected events; the issues would be easy to resolve with better communication between the festival and the race organizers, followed by clearer instructions to the racers. In the end we did get our drinks, but some people were frustrated by the confusion. Also noted as an issue was the lack of water at the end of the race, as well as the absence of washrooms. I suspect the organizers assumed the location would have public access washrooms, but these were not accessible during the event. Again, this seems like a growth area for a new event, and they are things that they can easily resolve next year.

With a flat, fast course, great weather, and a wonderful atmosphere this is a race I will definitely head back to next year. Besides, who doesn’t love a useful finisher’s medal?

 

Skirting the Storm

Summer Storm

My ride home from work yesterday managed to avoid this storm. It hit north of me just before I started out, but by the time I arrived safely at home the storm was over my departure point. Strong winds, some lightening and thunder, but a dry ride.
This post is a response to the Daily Post: Storm

Early Bird Triathlon Review

A few weeks ago I participated in my first triathlon, the Early Bird Triathlon organized by Somersault Events, a local company whose events “are organized primarily for the recreational enjoyment of participants of all ages and stages.”  This sentence from their mission statement perfectly describes me and my focus as an athlete.  I enter races not for prize money, but for the enjoyment.

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2016 Early Bird Tri & Du Race shirt

In terms of a simple goal for the day, score one for the Early Bird Sprint Tri.  I had a great day, as I usually do at Somersault events.  In an earlier post, “I am a Triathlete!”,  I described my somewhat spotty/sketchy/non-existent training plan for the day.

strava calendar 2016

Not much training done for a late May event. Oops!

With such a weak lead up to the day, I wasn’t really sure how things were going to turn out.  I needn’t have worried.

The night before race day, I organized all of my gear, making sure I had my bag packed with bike shoes, helmet, towels, food, water, and race bib. I made sure the tires had air, and that the bike computer worked. And it was good that I checked both of those things, because they both needed work. The air int he tires wasn’t a big deal, but imagine my surprise at 11 pm to discover my bike computer had stopped working. Fortunately my workbench has a drawer full of mysteries. Imagine Mr. Dressup’s Tickle Trunk and you have a good idea of the remarkable things I have hidden away “just in case”. That’s right, I had the exact right battery. So I got that sorted out and headed off to bed.

Flat SeeHaleRun Tri version

Flat SeeHaleRun

On the day of the race, I was up before the alarm clock, earlier than I usually get up for work. I even woke up before the coffee machine started. Seriously, who gets up on a Saturday before the alarm clock? Okay, maybe I was a little anxious. One of the great things about Somersault events is the number of people you run into there. The events draw all sorts of people to them, from recreational athletes (me!) to elite athletes, and everybody in between. As I was loading my bike into the van my neighbours came out and started loading their car. Of course they were also headed to the race to cheer on family members (including the 72 year old mother) who were going to compete in the Try-a-Tri and the Sprint Tri distances. After the event another neighbour stopped by to say she had seen me finish as her kids were competing in the Kids race. Ottawa is a small town, but we’re pretty active.

Once I arrived at the race, which was centered around the Carleton University campus, I found a parking spot not too far from the setup area. One of the benefits of using Carleton is the abundance of parking, and a good path system for people to travel between the swim area and bike/run transition zone. Because the race is in late May, there is no open water swim; instead the swim is held in the Carleton 50m pool. Of course the downside is that it is 500+ meters between the pool and the transition zone so you have to accept the time loss (if you choose to walk rather than run back to the T-zone).  Once I found a good spot for my bike and gear that provided good landmarks so I would remember where to go, and gave me a good path to the bike and run routes, I went to get marked up. Fortunately, there was space beside my bike for my brother-in-law so when he arrived a few minutes later he was able to set up quickly.

While I had taken part in the pre-race orientation session the evening before during packet pick-up, I was not really prepared for the mass that is the self-seeding wave start. The pool area was very well organized, but there were a lot of people waiting to get into the water. Thankfully my brother-in-law settled me down and explained that there will be a wait before we needed to worry about our place in line. Each swimmer is sent out at 15 second intervals so the line did take a while to get to us.  He also encouraged me to join the 12 minute line for the swim instead of the 15 minute group. As I mentioned, I hadn’t really prepared for the race, and had not done any real swimming so I was going to take it easy and take a slower pace.  Am I ever glad I didn’t do that! As it was, I could have passed my brother-in-law; we finished the 500m together under 12 minutes. Once out of the pool, we headed back outside to our shoes and started to walk/run back to the T-zone for the 21 km bike ride.

Unlike last year’s duathlon, my bike did not have any mechanical issues during the tri.  I’m sure that has a lot to do with the tune-up it received from Mobivelo as an early Father’s Day gift.  The gears worked great this time. I wasn’t trying to kill myself as I had not been on the bike at all. In fact the first time I rode it this year was race day — not a recommended strategy — and I’m pretty happy with my 46 minute time. Sure I’m not winning any prizes with that time, but it was good and my legs were strong the entire ride. The route itself went north from Carleton U along the Rideau Canal and then back to Hog’s Back Falls and back to to Carleton; the Sprint Distance did this loop twice. The segment to Hog’s Back is slightly uphill so it was a good challenge for my untested legs.

https://www.strava.com/activities/583161907/embed/c7025ef98e7b1bffe66fedc22a32b82fecfbcb4d

The return to the T-zone was slower than I planned. I still have to work on switching from my bike shoes to my running shoes.  Even though I have speed laces, I still find the move to running gear is my slowest. Oh well, if it was easy it wouldn’t be worth doing again and again. Regardless, the run was also okay except that it was along the uneven edge of the road. Because I was worried about injuring myself, I ran on the road until the path evened out a bit.  I had practiced this out-and-back loop route the week before so i wasn’t totally unfamiliar with it and I was ready for the hill in the middle.  It was great to see my neighbours along the route as they cheered me on, especially on the way back.  As I often do, I fell in with a runner whose pace I liked and stuck with her.  She was finishing the Long Tri and she looked like she could run forever.  I kept up with her, though, and finished strong (I think). Even with a slow transition, I managed to come in just under 30 minutes. When I crossed the line I raised my hands triumphantly, knowing that I am a triathlete.

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Brothers & Triathletes in arms!

Having now completed a tri, even a Sprint distance, I know I will do another. I may even challenge myself to a longer distance, just not yet. For those looking to give multi-sport a try, consider one of the Somersault Events. They’re fun, but challenging, and they have distances to fit most abilities from beginner to elite.

Street: not a parking lot


One of the intriguing aspects of my job at summer school is PCO (Parking Control Officer) duty and the fact that people use this blind corner as a parking lot. Even though we tell them every day there is a safe and accessible parking lot on the other side of the building, with a door to the classroom hallway, parents still want to let their kids off on this blind corner. This is a relatively busy street with a city bus route. Amazingly there have been no accidents yet. Of course there are still 15 days of summer school ahead.

This panoramic picture is part of the WordPress Developing Your Eye course. 

After the storm that is June

June is always a busy time in my home. Both my wife and I are trying to wrap up the year in our respective schools, the kids are ready to be done with school, there  are birthdays, and there are retirements. With all that, there is little time for running. At least we were getting out to walk the dog 3km most nights. Still, a walk is not a run.  I did try to get out for a run one night, but it was interrupted by President Obama’s visit to Ottawa. Apparently my route along the Rideau Canal interfered with the security of his route to the airport. 
So we’ve made it to July, and now my running can resume.  My brother-in-law Has signed me up for another Sprint Triathlon July 31 so I have a few weeks to get ready for that. Compared to the Early Bird, I should be in much better shape and have a better result. My only concern is the open water swim, but at 500m it won’t be that terrible. Starting tomorrow I will be biking to summer school (a little over 8km each way). 

Tonight in running a 5k fun run to support my daughter’s field hockey club, The Nepean Nighthawks. I haven’t run in over 2 weeks, so it will nice to be moving again. 

BBQ Easter Weekend

My wife likes to point out, rightly so, that I don’t do much of the cooking. That said, when I do cook it’s pretty good but it usually involves the BBQ, regardless of the season or the weather. This weekend, being Easter and a four day weekend, I spent a fair bit of time on the BBQ. Sure I could have been running, especially Sunday when it was unseasonably warm in Ottawa, but instead I helped out with the family meals in my favourite way.

It started out simply enough with lunchtime hot dogs and buns at my mother-in-law’s, but that was just the primer for dinner. In the morning I had prepared the run spices for our dinner — beer can chicken. In the afternoon, I prepped the cans of Goose Island IPA, and set up the three chickens. FYI, Costco often has the three packs of chicken on sale so it’s how I often shop.


The three birds were the centre piece for dinner that also had a wonderful spinach salad, potatoes, and green beans. It was a wonderful dinner enjoyed by the entire family of 13!

Of course even with so many people, three birds does leave some leftovers. My lovely wife thought Saturday was the perfect day to try quesadillas on the grill. She adapted a receipt from Looney Spoons and I was back at the grill. While I used my cast iron skillet, next time I will probably just use the grills.


  

It was a great recipe, and a definite make again. Of course, later that day I discovered a quesadilla recipe in one of my Weber Grilling cookbooks with a few cooking tips. They will come in handy next time.

A well used and loved cookbook


 

My most often used Weber cookbook.

Easter Sunday was the big cooking day. In addition to my regular BBQ bacon for breakfast (the neighbours must love me!), it was also the big family dinner. Because my wife always takes care of the cooking at these big events, which isn’t even close to fair, I offered to cook whatever she brought home. Of course knowing it was Easter and my family has certain expectations, I was pretty confident a turkey would be involved. For Christmas my parents gave me a rotisserie for my Weber; I had only used it once before when I cooked a pork loin roast, so I figured why not try a turkey. While my kids kept teasing me about ruining a nice family dinner, and referring to the bird is Butch, I hoped to be more successful than Stuart McClean’s Dave and his Christmas Turkey.

My wife is a very smart woman, and she knows I can’t tell time to save my life. She told me to have dinner ready for 5:00 which meant I had to have the turkey on the BBQ at about 2:30 so it would have enough time to cook. You would think that after 22 years of marriage I would know she had given me a false time, a buffer for success, but I don’t think it really registered. I do, however, know it takes time to prep a meal, especially the first time you try it. Sure enough I started prepping the turkey at 1:30, getting it ready for cooking and getting it secured on the spit. Starting early paid off, though as I had the bird on the BBQ on time.

Not surprisingly, I had a few issues. First the BBQ wasn’t firing properly and was not getting hot enough. Then I had an issue with my trussing job which took two attempts to fix. That was compounded by a problem with the tines slipping.  Once all of these issues were resolved, I was cooking with fire (pun intended). And it was 3:00. When I mentioned to my wife that I was worried because of the lost 30 minutes, she let me know that perhaps she had built a the buffer — we were exactly on time.


Dinner was a big success. The turkey and stuffing turned out great. My mother brought a ham. We had mashed potatoes, bacon beans (another Looney Spoons recipe), heritage vegetables, and candy cane baby beets. All of this was served with a healthy side of laughter and cheer.

What are your favourite BBQ recipes? Do you BBQ all year or are you a fair weather BBQ’er?

Be the Change

After spending an entire day on a computer dealing with data — not my usual work day — I didn’t have the energy or focus to write my NaBloPoMo for the day. Today, however, I’m starting things off by dropping my son at the We Day event in Ottawa at the Canadian Tire Centre, home of the NHL’s Ottawa Senators. This student focused event is designed to encourage kids and young adults to make a change that helps society and or the world they live in. These socially minded young activists will hear speeches from other agents of change, music from some awesome artist, and even a few politicians (like Canada’s newest Prime Minister Justin Trudeau!).

While I have been part of some smaller We Day and Me2We activities, this is my first time inside the big show. If yesterday was a compete energy sucker, the short time I got to spend with this group today has completely re-energized me.

 What will you do to to make a change?

After some introductions and a traditional Algonquin welcome, the show started with a reenactment of Craig Kielburger’s class speech which was the impetus for the work that he and his brother Marc have been doing for 20 years through their Me To We organization. For more information, check out http://www.metowe.com/.

 

And one last bonus, here is Prime Minister Trudeau’s presentation to the crowd, his first major public address as PM.

Art Imitating Life: Hectic Days

The last few days at school have pretty hectic. These pictures I took in the summer seem to be a good visual representation of how we’ve been feeling.  The pictures were taken at the Ottawa International Airport, and I was experimenting with light trails.

Thankfully today was an easier and more positive day thanks to our Junior Awards Ceremony when we took time to recognize and celebrate our students’ successes during the last school year.

What Have I Got Myself Into?

My brother-in-law has done it again.  After suggesting, encouraging, and goading me into signing up for a duathlon this summer, I received this email:

That’s right, he signed me up for the event. I guess he knew I would keep putting him off or avoiding his suggestions/encouragement.   For those of you who are unaware, the Sprint Duathlon is a 2k run, followed by a 20k bike ride, finished off with a 5k run.  Sure, why wouldn’t I try this?  Ummm … because I’m basically lazy!  Alright, that’s not really a good description of me, although not far off the truth.   It really is a compliment from my brother-in-law since he does have faith I can actually complete a Sprint Duathlon.  Besides, he was right about my ability to run my first 5k and my one and only half marathon.

I think I really did myself in when I told him how much I had been running lately.  What he missed, however, was the little point about me having not been on my bike yet this year.  Oh sure I’ve had grand plans, but so far the bike is still in the basement on the trainer stand I DIDN’T use all winter.  I really be testing the old adage about not forgetting how to ride a bike.  I’ve got a few weeks to remember, but I think there’s more to this than just getting back on the saddle.

Do you have any tips for training for a duathlon? Have you ever entered an event you might not be ready for?